28 July 2019

From a White Ground opens Friday 2 August 6-8pm


Open Fri-Sat 11am-5pm  3 - 18 August

From a white ground is a joint exhibition by Nicole Ellis and Barbara Halnan,  questioning the place or role of the white ground in their recent works.  By putting emphasis on the primary existence of the white ground the artists look at the connections between their different practices that emerge from this point of departure.

Halnan has been working on white canvases or panels incorporating texture and subtle colour. She uses multiple panels of various sizes to create four different works, which look at numbers, line and form and incorporate elements of low relief.

Ellis’ textile-based collages use offcuts and pieces of fabric left over from earlier works. The surfaces are marked with paint and other chance details, which indicate previous activity. The muted colours on the white ground create space and a luminance which destabilizes the forms and enforces the negative spaces.




Nicole Ellis, Light Ground (brown) 2018, fabric and acrylic paint on canvas, 76.2 x 55.8 cm 

Barbara Halnan Wandering 2019. Nine panels, each 21x21 cm form a grid approx. 75x75 cm. Acrylic, collage and applied texture on MDF panels.



http://www.nicoleellis.net/
http://bhalnan.blogspot.com/

15 July 2019

Archeological Survey: Inner West Sydney Sector to Outback Beyond - opening 6-8pm Friday 26 July

Luke Power

Open 11am - 5pm Sat 27-Sun 28 July

project space project #18


Luke Power Texting Home (2019). Paper collage, street posters.
Sliced, diced, ripped and torn: layer upon layer of paper exposed 

and transformed as discarded street posters become works of art. 

Graphic art, the language of advertising, concepts around cultural events, memory, place, home, and belonging are fragmented and arranged in collaged assemblages. 

Thick layers of large posters ripped off walls – popular, political and cultural messages for the masses, are dissected into circular samples and integrated with other artefacts [rusty car parts, video imagery, plant and soil matter from Central Australia]. The pop posters are a peephole, a liminal zone, disrupting the misnomer ‘wilderness’ which harks back to the Terra Nullius declaration by colonial populations. 

Raymond Haines, the French conceptual assemblage artist (1926-2005), collected Venice Biennale street posters in the 60s and 70s,  showing the beauty of decayed surfaces and the history of layered paper 'collated over time' by random event organisers. His retrospective exhibition of these collages in the 2017 Venice Biennale was mesmerising. Fast forward to the 90s, and New Zealand-born Australian artist, Rosalie Gascoigne, playfully cuts up black and yellow road work signs, shuffles them into a two tone, joyful jumble of text and line through sculptural imagery.

Artworks developed for Archeological Survey: Inner West Sydney Sector extends these processes to expose our memories, connecting country to city - morĂ©s, materiality, languages - our ephemeral ‘footprints’. 






2 July 2019

Laine Hogarty - Industry of parts

Opening event Friday 12 July 6-8pm

Open 11am-5pm 13-14 July

project space project #17

Extending on an earlier work called “democracy of parts", Laine's installation in ArticulateUpstairs reflects on the impermanency of art production. Manoeuvring reclaimed materials, through the space as a roving canvas, she references the site and also her intuitive connection to the project space as an exploratory art laboratory.

The artwork has no specific final or intended form nor any particular function except to reference its location and any feelings or experiences that may arise in the space. Visitors to the project space are invited to engage in the movement of the parts as a process of play to contribute to the production of the work. 

At the finale of the project the documented findings will be displayed as an animated sequence of images that reference the process which has no final intent other than to map the space.

Articulate began the project space project as an experiment with exhibition practice in which artists develop artwork in a space over a 2 week period, leaving any decision about if or when to open it to visitors to later in that period. The purpose is to support the development of artwork that acknowledges the place in which it is located by being largely conceived and constructed there. See earlier project space projects here. 





Laine Hogarty Untitled 2019